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sustainable American caviar & sturgeon North Carolina | U.S.A

NO HORMONES • NO BORAX • NO ANTIBIOTICS

Osetra caviar comes only from Russian sturgeon (acipenser gueldenstaedii).
In the traditional caviar hierarchy, the Caspian Sea sturgeon species produce the best caviars in the world.
Of these, the top 3 are Beluga, Osetra and Sevruga. Osetra caviar is shadowed only by Beluga, with Sevruga in third place.

Ossetra (also Osetra, Oscetra) caviar refers specifically to the roe of Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), referred to as the Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) in some regions (N. Fletcher, Caviar, Reaction Books Ltd. 2010). The “Osetra” label is reserved for Russian sturgeon caviar the way that the label “Black Angus” beef can only come from the exceptional breed of cattle that bears that name. There are 27 sturgeon species worldwide, including white sturgeon (acipenser transmontanous), Siberian sturgeon (acipenser baerii) and Sevruga (acipenser stellatus). These varieties do not produce Osetra.

Marshallberg Farm is proud to produce domestic, sustainable, quality Osetra caviar and Russian sturgeon meat. With facilities in eastern and western North Carolina, we are the the only producer of Russian sturgeon and Osetra caviar in the U.S.A.

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Today's Caviar no more wild caught

Due to overfishing, virtually all caviar from Caspian Sea sturgeon species (and most others) is currently farmed. Caspian sturgeon species are critically endangered in the wild. More than 80% of caviar in the world is produced in China. Unlike China, the U.S. enforces strict food, safety and environmental regulations. Therefore, unlike imports, U.S. farms can not use hormones (for egg release stimulation), antibiotics (to counteract infection do to poor conditions and surgical procedures) and borax (used as a “hardening” agent for forced (mushy) ovulated eggs) in aquaculture.

 

our facilities pioneers of r.a.s.

Our facilities are HACCP-approved by the USDA. By providing a superior supply of sustainable meat and caviar, we positively impact endangered wild sturgeon. Our fish are fed a high quality diet free of added hormones or antibiotics. Click here for more information on our facilities and recirculating aquaculture systems.

 

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    Adults
  • hatchlings
    Hatchlings
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    Juveniles
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    Adults

farmed sturgeon hatch to harvest

Today, Osetra caviar is produced exclusively from Russian sturgeon aquaculture. In addition to being the primary source of caviar today, aquaculture of sturgeon is presently considered the most important component of wild sturgeon conservation programs because controlled culture decreases the need or desire for harvesting fish from remaining wild populations. 

 

critically endangered crisis in the caspian

Prehistoric survivors of the ice age, sturgeon are among the largest freshwater fishes in the world, with some individuals exceeding 2,000 pounds. Sturgeons grow slowly and mature late, making them particularly vulnerable to man-made pressures, including overfishing, poaching, habitat loss and pollution. The Caspian Sea and its rivers are highly polluted from the oil industry and once abundant spawning grounds for sturgeon have been ruined by dams. The few remaining Russian Sturgeon are being caught illegally. Populations of valuable caviar-producing species have dropped to as low as 5% of historical levels worldwide.  This is particularly evident in the Caspian Sea region, which has traditionally been the source of most of the world’s caviar. In fact, as of 2013, all species of sturgeon native to that region, as well as several from other continents including North America are currently listed as endangered or critically endangered.

Hope for the Sturgeon >

Above: Astrakhan, Russia - June 17, 1985: Some of the last Russian sturgeon, caught in fishing nets on the river Volga. This fishing area called "The 9th AAAAAAA" was not far from the Caspian sea.
Above: Astrakhan, Russia – June 17, 1985: Some of the last Russian sturgeon, caught in fishing nets on the river Volga. This fishing area called “The 9th AAAAAAA” was not far from the Caspian sea.

conservation hope for sturgeon

In addition to being the primary source of caviar today, sustainable aquaculture of sturgeon is presently considered the most important component of wild sturgeon conservation programs. 

Early conservation efforts of sturgeon include the establishment of hatchery operations along the Volga River by the USSR in the early 1950s. Modern day sturgeon aquaculture traces its roots to the efforts of those Soviet biologists.

U.S. farmed Russian sturgeon is a “Best Choice” for sustainable seafood by Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch.
LOGO-FINAL

 

Sustainable Osetra Caviar & Sturgeon

Due to overfishing, all caviar from Caspian Sea sturgeon species (and most others) is currently farmed. Caspian sturgeon species are critically endangered in the wild. More than 80% of caviar in the world is produced in China. Unlike China, the U.S. enforces strict food, safety and environmental regulations. Therefore, unlike imports, U.S. farms can not use hormones (for egg release stimulation), antibiotics (to counteract infection do to poor conditions and surgical procedures) and borax (used as a “hardening” agent for forced (mushy) ovulated eggs) in aquaculture. Farmed Russian sturgeon is a Best Choice for sustainable seafood by Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch.

WHAT IS OSETRA?
Osetra caviar comes only from Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedii). In the traditional caviar hierarchy, the Caspian Sea sturgeon species produce the best caviars in the world. Of these, the top 3 are Beluga, Osetra and Sevruga. Osetra caviar is shadowed only by Beluga, with Sevruga in third place. 
Ossetra (also Osetra, Oscetra) caviar refers specifically to the roe of Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), referred to as the Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) in some regions (N. Fletcher, Caviar, Reaction Books Ltd. 2010). The “Osetra” label is reserved for Russian sturgeon caviar the way that the label “Black Angus” beef can only come from the exceptional breed of cattle that bears that name. There are 27 sturgeon species worldwide including white sturgeon (acipenser transmontanous), Siberian sturgeon (acipenser baerii) and Sevruga (acipenser stellatus). These varieties do not produce Osetra.

AQUACULTURE ON THE FARM
Marshallberg Farm owns and operates two Russian sturgeon farms: Marshallberg Farm and LaPaz [also known and Atlantic Caviar and Sturgeon], both in North Carolina. The two farms are similar in size (each about a million gallons of culture water), both are indoor re-circulating aquaculture systems (RAS), and each has processing facilities for caviar and meat. Marshallberg Farm is the largest producer of Russian Sturgeon (Acipenser gueidenstaedtii) meat and Osetra caviar in North America. For more information on our facilities, click here.

From Hatch to Harvest

The farming process at Marshallberg Farm begins in the hatchery under carefully controlled conditions. After sufficient growth, juveniles are stocked into production tanks. When fish reach age 4, males and females are identified and separated, then grown further until maturation. They are placed into separate tanks in crystal clear water in preparation for harvest. The time that juveniles are stocked until the caviar is ready to harvest, normally takes at least 10 years.

THE STURGEON SAGA
Prehistoric survivors of the ice age, sturgeon are among the largest freshwater fishes in the world, with some individuals exceeding 2,000 pounds. Sturgeons grow slowly and mature late, making them particularly vulnerable to man-made pressures, including overfishing, poaching, habitat loss and pollution. The Caspian Sea and its rivers are highly polluted from the oil industry and once abundant spawning grounds for sturgeon have been ruined by dams. The few remaining Russian Sturgeon are being caught illegally. Populations of valuable caviar-producing species have dropped to as low as 5% of historical levels worldwide. This is particularly evident in the Caspian Sea region, which has traditionally been the source of most of the world’s caviar. In fact, as of 2013, all species of sturgeon native to that region, as well as several from other continents including North America are currently listed as endangered or critically endangered.

STURGEON CONSERVATION
Early conservation efforts of sturgeon include the establishment of hatchery operations along the Volga River by the USSR in the early 1950s.  Modern day sturgeon aquaculture traces its roots to the efforts of those Soviet biologists.
In addition to being the primary source of caviar today, aquaculture of sturgeon is presently considered the most important component of wild sturgeon conservation programs.

 

U.S. farmed Russian sturgeon is a “Best Choice” for sustainable seafood by Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch.
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